Cumin

13 Surprising Benefits Of Cumin

The health benefits of cumin include its ability to aid in digestion, improve immunity and treat piles, insomnia, respiratory disorders, asthma, bronchitis, common cold, lactation, anemia, skin disorders, boils and cancer. cumin benefits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits1. It Will Help Your Body Maintain a Healthy Alkaline pH Level

Most of us tend to be more acidic than alkaline. One of the first steps toward better health is a body that’s more alkaline. As the acid-alkaline balance is essential, with so many bodily functions occurring only at a certain level of acidity or alkalinity, the body is constantly striving to achieve a state of equilibrium. Just a small change in pH can have a profound effect on body functioning. Continue reading

Chickpeas

Top 10 Health Benefits of Chickpeas health benefits of chickpeas health benefits of garbanzo beans

Chickpeas, also called garbanzo beans, belong to the legume family, which includes a variety of beans, peanuts, soybeans and lentils. Opting for legumes over foods high in saturated fat might lower your risk of heart disease, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. Chickpeas also offer specific health benefits, and consuming them regularly boosts your intake of a few key nutrients. Continue reading

Strawberries

8 Surprising Benefits Of Strawberries

 The health benefits of strawberries include improved eye care, proper brain function, relief from high blood pressure, arthritis, gout and various cardiovascular diseases. The impressive polyphenolic and antioxidant content of strawberries make them good for improving the immune system, preventing against various types of cancers, and for reducing the signs of premature aging.

Buckwheat

2015-07-08-1436374933-6373539-Buckwheat_600_x_450.jpg

Buckwheat may be one of the healthiest foods you’re not eating. Along with having numerous health benefits, it is tasty, easy to prepare and inexpensive.

Buckwheat is not a grain.
Many who are trying to avoid grains find themselves limited to fruit and sweet potatoes as sources of good carbs. Even though it’s often included in lists of grains, buckwheat is not a grain. The edible portion is a seed from a plant related to greens like rhubarb and sorrel.

Buckwheat is gluten-free.
Because it is neither a grain nor related to wheat, buckwheat is gluten-free and safe for those with celiac disease and gluten sensitivities. Studies show that even in high concentrations, buckwheat flour and its purified proteins have no immunologic reactions for patients with celiac disease. [1]

Buckwheat is high in essential nutrients.
It is rich in many trace minerals, including manganese, magnesium and copper. It is also a good source of the B vitamins: B6, pantothenic acid, niacin, folate, thiamin and choline.

Nutrients in Buckwheat

2015-07-08-1436374647-435612-Buckwheat.png

Buckwheat has resistant fiber.
Resistant fiber is a compound shown to lower blood sugar after meals, help weight loss, reduce food cravings and improve diabetes. [3] All versions of buckwheat contain resistant fiber, but the boiled kernels, called groats, contain the most at 6 percent or greater. [4]

Buckwheat has several novel nutraceuticals.
Rutin, quercetin and other bioflavonoids:
These compounds have been shown to strengthen small blood vessels, which can prevent easy bruising, hemorrhoids and varicose veins. Rutin can also help prevent blood clots, lower LDL cholesterol and the production of histamine, which can improve airborne allergies and food intolerances. [5]

10 Health Benefits of Buckwheat

Contrary to its name, this fruit seed is not in any way related to wheat.

Buckwheat is a gluten free power food.

It is becoming very popular for many good reasons.

It is a highly nourishing, energizing and tasty food that can be eaten instead of rice or the usual porridge.

10 Health Benefits:

1. Best source of high-quality, easily digestible proteins.
This makes it an excellent meat substitute.
High protein buckwheat flour is being studied for possible use in foods to reduce plasma cholesterol, body fat, and cholesterol gallstones.

2.  Fat alternative.
Buckwheat starch can also act as a fat alternative in processed foods.

3.  The high level of rutin is extracted from the leaves for medicine to treat high blood pressure.

4.  Non allergenic.
Buckwheat hulls are used as pillow stuffing for those allergic to feathers, dust, and pollen.

5. May help diabetes.
New evidence has found that buckwheat may be helpful in the management of diabetes according to Canadian researchers in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
With a glycemic index of 54, it lowers blood sugars more slowly than rice or wheat products.

6. Great for the digestion.
“The properties of buckwheat are: Neutral thermal nature; sweet flavor; cleans and strengthens the intestines and improves appetite. Is effective for treating dysentery and chronic diarrhea.”  According to Paul Pitchford in Healing with Whole Foods (1993)

7. Chemical free.
Buckwheat grows so quickly that it does not usually require a lot of pesticides or other chemicals to grow well.

8.  Buckwheat is good at drawing out retained water and excess fluid from swollen areas of the body.

9.  Buckwheat is a warming food.
It is classified by macrobiotics as a yang food. It is great for eating in the cold winter months.

10.  Buckwheat contains no gluten and is not a grain.
It is therefore great for celiacs and those on grain free and gluten sensitive diets.

buckwheat growing Buckwheat Benefits

Nutrition:

  • Has high quality protein, containing all nine essential amino acids, including lysine.
  • Rich in iron.
  • Very high in carbohydrates (80%).
  • Very high in antioxidants.
  • Filled with many minerals and vitamins such as zinc, copper, and niacin.
  • Contains a high level of rutin.

 

History:

Buckwheat has been eaten since the eighth millennium BC. It was gathered from the wild in where it grew naturally. When cultivation began is not known.

Buckwheat is native to Northern Europe and Asia. It was cultivated in China from the 10th through the 13th century. Then in the 14th and 15th centuries it spread to Europe and Russia. Later it came to the United States by the Dutch during the 17th century.

How to Store:

Store in a airtight container in a cool dry place. Buckwheat flour is best stored in the refrigerator.

Tips for eating or cooking:

Rinse buckwheat under running water before cooking to remove dirt or debris.

  • Buckwheat can be milled into flour to make things like pancakes and pasta.
  • The groats and grits make a tasty cereal.
  • In Russia they roast the whole groats to make kasha.
  • Buckwheat groats roasted are a very tasty addition to soups and other grain dishes.
  • Buckwheat is gluten-free; this makes it a great substitute for grains.
  • In Japan they use buckwheat flour to make Soba noodles, which is a traditional dish.
  • Buckwheat is also used in the chocolate bar and snack food industry.